Booking:

Let's be as up front about this as possible.

There is a long-standing debate on "who should pay who" when it comes to models and photographers working together. Opinions vary quite a lot, and often it is not clear who has the "right" to ask for a fee, and who doesn't. To me, it's something I accept as being very fluid, very flexible. Allow me to explain...

Yes, I agree that if a new photographer approaches an experienced model, the model has the right to ask for payment. And, of course vice versa. If an experienced photographer is approached by a newer model, the photographer has the right to ask for payment.  There is a lot of blurry area here, because how do you accurately gauge experience, skills, and overall professionalism between the two parties if it's not really obvious? That's why I believe the situation is flexible, and a case by case thing.

Others argue that if you are a full-time working professional, model or photographer, you should only work for payment. Makes sense, and this is sound business advice. But what happens when a full-time model wants to approach a full-time photographer to shoot – or the other way around? Exactly. Once again, it is as clear as mud most of the time.

But this is what I really want to address: the personal element. In our industry, people take things personally all too often, and these perceived transgressions turn into rants on social media about "those cheap models who think they are too high and mighty to pay" and the "rude photographers who think I am going to pay them", etc.  Photographers get "offended" that a new model refuses to pay them, and experienced models get offended when photographers refuse their rates, as well, etc, ad infinitum.

As model photographers, we often find ourselves "trapped" when a model asks us to trade shoot, and we see no benefit or inspiration to trade with them. By declining the trade request, we can often be accused of being everything from rude to egotistical to "That photographer doesn't think I'm pretty enough to work with me", and lots more. We photographers feel trapped because any answer that isn't "Sounds good, when should we schedule?" can lead to an offended model, and all the fallout that comes from that. I've been at this nearly a decade, and have met some of the most amazing people in the world in our industry – I am grateful to every model, every client, and every associate I have come to know as a friend and peer. But I am also not going to continue this tired argument.

So I want to make it crystal clear: If you ask me for a trade shoot, I have every right to decline for any reason. This is business, not personal. I do not shoot models who I think are "hot" just because "I like hot chicks". There are many reasons why I consider trade shoots, and many reasons why I do not. Just like you, as a model, have a right to send me your rates if I ask you to shoot, I have a right as a photographer, as an artist, to decline a trade shoot without fear of retribution from an offended model. Some photographers have a reputation of being "jerks" (and many of them deserve that rep), but some are just wholly honest about things and are inaccurately accused of being terrible people when all they did was politely decline a trade shoot.

Now, all that aside, the thing is, if you want to work with me the fastest way possible, and in a way where I will go all out for you and your project, simply hire me. I go all out for my clients, and I actually take on very few new clients in any given quarter. I am super pumped to work with you, and I take care of my clients as best I can. My rates reflect that.

If you choose to approach me about a trade shoot, that is perfectly ok. But just like I have to deal with the industry truths, you have to accept if I politely decline. I am wide open to ideas, to proposals, and to amazing projects – but like so many other professionals, I cannot random accept everything everyone offers me (even when sometimes I'd like to.) 

If you're good with all of this, let's talk! :)

The scheduling:

  • Locations for your shoot can vary wildly, and I shoot just about anywhere. 
  • I don't use any particular studio, but can rent any for your shoot (at a cost, of course). Same for hotels.
  • Other locations can be almost anywhere, and depending on what city you are in, I may have some contacts for warehouses, homes, pools, ranches, shops, etc. that may be good for what you are looking to do.
  • My availability is 7 days a week. If I am not booked and can get you in any day of the week, I'm game. I am in Houston most of the time, but some weekends a month I am in other cities around the country (check my travel schedule on social media)
  • I don't have fixed-hour shoot packages, I quote every project both in money and in time depending on what you want done. Your shoot could be an hour or all day, just depends. I'll let you know up front.

The prep:

  • I can call on top makeup artists and hairstylists if you need their services, and their fees would be paid directly to them by you. I simply refer my best.
  • Your wardrobe is up to you, and can vary from glamour outfits to none at all (nudes) if that is what you want to shoot. I am not a fashion photographer, but am open to discuss your fashion projects; if I feel I can do it the way you expect it, I'll let you know.
  • Other wardrobe from designers or boutiques is up to you, as well. I have a relationship with some designers (especially in Houston) and am happy to refer you, but that is between you and them.
  • Makeup artist and hairstylist time must be taken into consideration if you want it done on site. I recommend getting your hair and makeup done before the shoot and arriving on time, ready to rock.

The money:

  • I quote every project individually after we discuss what are specifically wanting. To be perfectly clear, the amount of final edits you receive is to be decided on up front, and of course quoted as part of your total fee. Also, almost no photographer, including myself, will ever give out every single shot from a shoot. If you are looking to receive every single frame snapped at your shoot, I am not the photographer for you.
  • Your project costs could be almost any price, depending on your goals and what you specifically want done. A deposit of 25% of the quoted fee is required to secure your date and time schedule. Deposit is not refundable.  
  • Most of my private model shoots run, on average, $1,000-$1,500. Contact me to discuss what that usually involves.

 

The end result is you get the best images I can possibly provide and improve your portfolio instantly.

Contact me: nino@ninobatista.com or hit me up on Facebook or Instagram.